Bridestones

A climb up to Nab Ridge between Bilsdale and Tripsdale. Ended up trying to wade though a thistled rough pasture whilst following a diverted path around the manicured lawns of Cam House. And the pet llamas took a dislike to the dog.

I was aiming for the Bride Stones, a Bronze Age round barrow, long since gone with only the kerb stones remaining. A circle could clearly be seen, about ten metres in diameter, although many stones are now buried by the heather.

There are other Bride Stones on the moors and beyond throughout Northern England. Some say the name comes from Bride, the Mother Goddess of the Brigantes, a Celtic tribe inhabiting the modern counties of Yorkshire, Lancashire, Northumberland and Durham. Other placenames having the same etymology are Bridlington, Brigham and Brigg. An alternative theory is that the name originates from the Old English word for a young bird or chicken: “bridd”.

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