Lonsdale

A south facing offshoot of Kildale but draining into the River Tees. An evening view from Great Ayton Moor.

Lonsdale map

Hutton Moor

Ernaldsti, the medieval track named after Ernald de Percy, Lord of Kildale, cuts across Hutton Moor on Percy Rigg. Hutton Moor is part of the SSSI which covers most of the North York Moors‘ heather moorland. I do find it hard to understand why a landscape managed by man to maximise the production of one species at the expense of others should be designated as a SSSI.

Hutton Moor map

Temple Beeld

A most unusual feature on the North York Moors. I’m more used to coming across bields, to use the more usual spelling, in the Lakeland fells. This one has been built between five standing stones in the form of a cross so that sheep can shelter from which ever way the wind is blowing.  The location is on Lealholm Moor, a moor which is void of rock outcrops. The stone must have been carted in from quite a long distance. The bield is absent from the Ordnance Survey map but is quite clear on Google Maps from which it can be seen that the arms of the cross are slightly angled. Peculiar but clearly following a design.

Temple Beeld map

Urra Moor

On the highest point of the North York Moors, just a few metres off the the Cleveland Way National Trail, the Lyke Wake Walk and the Coast to Coast Walk is this sorry sight. A vain attempt to restore the blanket bog and heather moorland. Heather bales have been used to block the many ditches built by the landowners to drain the moor in the belief that better growing conditions for the heather will produce a bigger bag of grouse. Too little, too late is an appropriate catchphrase with compete erosion of the peat leaving acres of sterile wastes.

The degradation may have begun in the 1930s. Bill Cowley, writing twenty years later, records that Urra Moor was only then just beginning to recover from a major moorland fire prior to WW2.

Urra Moor map

Sleddale

An green island in a sea of heather.  Sleddale Beck is a tributary of the River Esk.

sleddale map

Good Goose Thorn

On Black Dike Moor above Scaling Dam, a stone, believed to be medieval, on the boundary between the parishes of Loftus and Glaisdale and inscribed with the curious name “Good Goose Thorn”, a name which is given on the 1853 Ordnance Survey map to another boundary stone one kilometre to the south west. I see a return visit to see if this stone is also so inscribed.

Good Goose Thorn map

Thurkilsti

Thurkilsti, or Thurkill’s hill road as mentioned in Walter Espec’s grant of land to Rievaulx Abbey in 1145. An ancient route across the moors from Welburn and Skiplam descending here down Turkey Nab on its way to Ingleby Greenhow and Stokesley. The route is now classified as a Byway Open to All Traffic which makes it very popular with off road vehicles.

The wall corner is named as Park Corner on old Ordnance Survey maps, the corner of Park Plantation. The blip on the horizon is Roseberry Topping, mostly hidden behind Easby Moor.

Thurkilsti map